Transportation Training Academy Workshop Catalog

Bridge and Structures 
Bicycle & Pedestrian
Communications
Environment
Facility Design
General 
Highway Safety
Hydrology
Legal 
Maintenance
Materials
Planning
Project Management 
Traffic Engineering and Operations
Work Zone Safety
Workforce Development

Bridges and Structures

Bridge Maintenance Inspection (1 Day – 6.8 Contact Hours)

This is a straight forward presentation that covers an overview of the various types of bridge designs, the different parts, components and function of structures and the importance of maintenance of these components. Numerous maintenance and repair activities will be presented. This is not intended to replace the NBIS (Nat’l Bridge Inspection System) certification program. It is intended for the local supervisors and crew member who work on and maintain bridges in their system.

Bicycle and Pedestrian

Bicyclists & Pedestrians:  Meeting the Needs (1 Day – 6.8 Contact Hours)

Complete Streets, livable communities, sustainable transportation; buzzwords abound, but one thing that is certain is that integrating bicyclists and pedestrians into our transportation network is receiving increased attention.  As transportation dollars shrink and energy costs increase the awareness of the needs of  bicyclists and pedestrians continues to increase at all levels of government, with greater emphasis on developing transportation infrastructure and communities that facilitate use of walking and bicycling as legitimate and desirable transportation modes, not merely recreation. This workshop will provide attendees with an understanding of policies and regulations, design standards and guidelines, new technologies and design treatments, and facility planning considerations needed to provide appropriate accommodations for bicyclists and pedestrians in a variety of contexts.  We will look at the broad spectrum of issues that impact the effective and efficient delivery of bicycle and pedestrian accommodations.  Students will learn the fundamentals of facility planning and design, understand the policies and regulations impacting bike and pedestrian accommodations, and also develop an understanding of how to consider the needs of bicyclists and pedestrians and the commensurate level of accommodations for varying contexts.  The course is not an in-depth course on facility design, but a comprehensive look at the many elements needed to provide bicycle and pedestrian accommodations and facilities. Attendees will take part in an outdoor “walkability audit”, rain or shine, and should dress appropriately.

Designing Pedestrian Facilities for Accessibility (1 Day – 6.8 Contact Hours)

Sidewalks, like roadways, need to be designed to serve all users.  To meet the requirements of all sidewalk users, designers and builders need a clear understanding of the wide range of abilities that occur within the population.  Pedestrian facility design and operation must comply with accessibility standards under the Americans with Disabilities Act 1990.  This workshop focuses on all current and emerging accessibility issues and the design parameters that affect sidewalk and street crossing design.

Pedestrian Safety (1 day – 6.8 Contact Hours)

Many communities in the United States were not designed for pedestrian travel.  However, today walkability is important for active transportation and is an indicator of a livable community.  Accommodating pedestrians must be done safely.  Each year, over 5,000 pedestrians are killed as a result of collisions with motor vehicles.  In some large urban areas, pedestrians account for as much as 40 to 50 percent of traffic fatalities. At the same time, non-motor-vehicle-involved pedestrian incidents in public places are also significant.  Data show that falls are the leading cause of injury reported to hospital emergency rooms (and a principal cause of tort claims filed against local governments).

The goal of this workshop is to help state and local road agencies address pedestrian safety in design, operations and maintenance.  Participants will: 1) understand pedestrian characteristics and their relation to safety, 2) learn the significance of land use, site design and roadway characteristics to pedestrian safety, and 3) learn effective design (of both pedestrian facilities and the roadway), traffic control and other countermeasures and best practices for reducing pedestrian crashes and injuries.  The importance of an interdisciplinary approach to addressing pedestrian safety issues and concerns is stressed.

Communications

Effective Public Speaking (1 Day – 6.8 Contact Hours)

Technical professionals are often called upon today to address various audiences and to explain technology in ways that are accessible and convincing.  This workshop will introduce you to the basic principles of effective professional public speaking and how to efficiently prepare presentations.  You will learn how to assess your audience, organize your ideas, prepare effective Powerpoint slides, and develop the skills you need in order to get your point across.  The workshop will show you how to deal with stage fright and to be an effective speaker in all kinds of situations.

Effective Technical Writing (1 Day – 6.8 Contact Hours)

One of the major challenges faced by engineers is to convey the intricacies of technology to a variety of audiences. This workshop will introduce you to the basic principles of effective technical communication and show you how to write and edit professional documents. You will learn how to approach writing tasks, how to design documents for different audiences, and proven techniques for revising and polishing your writing in order to get your point across. You are encouraged to send us a sample of the kind of writing you are interested in!

Environment

Introduction to NEPA (1 Day – 6.8 Contact Hours)

Any transportation project involving federal funding or FHWA’s approval have to comply with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) before final decisions are made about actions that could have environmental effects. NEPA requires Federal agencies to consider environmental effects that include, among others, impacts on social, cultural, and economic resources, as well as natural resources. Citizens often have valuable information about places and resources that they value and the potential environmental, social, and economic effects that proposed projects may have on those places and resources. This course has been developed to help state and local agencies receiving federal funding, as well as consultants assisting those agencies, to understand the overall purpose of the legislation and its applicability.

Facility Design

Pavement Design I (1 Day – 6.8 Contact Hours)

This course is intended as an introduction to pavement design using the 1993 AASHTO Design Guide for Pavement Structures. This method is currently used throughout the U.S. by consultants and state agencies for designing flexible and rigid pavement structures.  Upon completion of this course, participants will be able to: Understand the framework of the 1993 AASHTO Design Guide for both flexible and rigid pavements; Compute pavement responses in flexible and rigid pavements using modern software; Generate traffic data required for pavement design; Understand how materials are characterized for pavement design; Understand basic computations for drainage in pavements; Execute pavement design using the 1993 AASHTO Design Guide.

Pavement Design II (1 Day – 6.8 Contact Hours)

This course will introduce participants to mechanistic-empirical pavement design (M-E design). AASHTO will soon adopt the Mechanistic-Empirical Pavement Design Guide (MEPDG) as the standard procedure for structural pavement design in the U.S. This represents a fundamental shift in pavement design compared to existing practice. While the change is largely viewed to be beneficial, there is a steep learning-curve associated with the new methodology. This course is intended to provide participants with the general workings of M-E design with hands-on computer-based activities.  Upon completion of this course, participants will be able to: Understand the framework of M-E design for both flexible and rigid pavements; Compute pavement responses in flexible and rigid pavements using modern software; Generate traffic data required for M-E pavement design;  Understand data requirements for M-E material characterization; Understand performance prediction capabilities of M-E design; Execute M-E design using modern software.

Roadway Geometric Design I (1 Day – 6.8 Contact Hours)

This course is intended to provide an overview of basic roadway geometric design.  A one-day course on this topic can address a wide range of areas upon which additional continuing education can be built.  Therefore, this course can serve as a refresher for the experienced roadway design engineer as well as a foundation for the less-seasoned roadway design engineer or engineering technician. The course material is grouped into five general topics: basic design concepts, horizontal alignment, superelevation, vertical alignment, and intersections, and bicycle and pedestrian concepts.  An introduction will preface the material, and a summary and review of available resources will be provided at the end of the day. Upon completion of this course, participants will be able to: Apply basic roadway geometric design concepts; Establish horizontal and vertical alignments and perform supporting calculations; Execute preliminary designs for intersections; Describe basic concepts in design issues for bicycles and pedestrians.

Roadway Geometric Design II (1 Day – 6.8 Contact Hours)

This course is intended to delve into topics beyond the basics of roadway geometric design.  The course will begin with a brief review of design factors and establishment of horizontal and vertical alignments.  Topics addressed in greater depth include: cross-section elements, roadside design, bicycle and pedestrian facilities, intersections, and other topics, such as context-sensitive design and traffic calming.  An introduction will preface the material, and a summary and review of available resources will be provided at the end of the day.

Roadway Geometric Design III (1 Day – 6.8 Contact Hours)

This course is intended to delve into topics beyond the basics of roadway geometric design. The course will begin with a brief review of design factors and establishment of the alignment. Topics addressed in greater depth include: cross-section elements, access management, and the relationship between geometric design and safety as well as traffic control.  An introduction will preface the material, and a summary and review of available resources will be provided at the end of the day.

Modeling Stormwater 1 – Best Management Practices (1 Day – 6.8 Contact Hours)

The recently revised Virginia Stormwater Management Program (VSMP) regulations shift the intent of stormwater management from storage of peak runoff to reducing runoff volume and improving water quality performance through a series of stormwater control measures that mimic natural, pre-developed hydrology known as low impact development (LID) best management practices (BMPs). Improving water quality of stormwater is a significant part of the recently issued Chesapeake Bay TMDL, implemented through municipally separate storm sewer system (MS4) programs. This Modeling Stormwater (MSW) course is offered in two parts, as two separate workshops where MSW – 1 is a prerequisite for MSW – Day 2. Participants are welcome to enroll in only MSW – 1 or both days based on their interests and needs. MSW – 1 is focused on background information on VSMP, use of the Runoff Reduction Method spreadsheet provided with the draft Virginia Stormwater Management Handbook (VSMH), and discussion of the design of BMPs, Virginia-approved BMPs (in particular LID BMPs), and the advantages and disadvantages of software for hydrologic and hydraulic design of BMPs. MSW -2 will go through a BMP design exercise from start to finish touching on applicable regulations through the design experience.  Collectively, MSW -1 and MSW – 2 will provide users with the knowledge to use hydrologic and hydraulic simulation software to assist in BMP design and evaluation to meet these new requirements.

Modeling Stormwater 2 – Best Management Practices (1 Day – 6.8 Contact Hours)

The recently revised Virginia Stormwater Management Program (VSMP) regulations shift the intent of stormwater management from storage of peak runoff to reducing runoff volume and improving water quality performance through a series of stormwater control measures that mimic natural, pre-developed hydrology known as low impact development (LID) best management practices (BMPs). Improving water quality of stormwater is a significant part of the recently issued Chesapeake Bay TMDL, implemented through municipally separate storm sewer system (MS4) programs. This Modeling Stormwater (MSW) course is offered in two parts, as two separate workshops where MSW – 1 is a prerequisite for MSW – Day 2. Participants are welcome to enroll in only MSW – 1 or both days based on their interests and needs. MSW – 1 is focused on background information on VSMP, use of the Runoff Reduction Method spreadsheet provided with the draft Virginia Stormwater Management Handbook (VSMH), and discussion of the design of BMPs, Virginia-approved BMPs (in particular LID BMPs), and the advantages and disadvantages of software for hydrologic and hydraulic design of BMPs. MSW -2 will go through a BMP design exercise from start to finish touching on applicable regulations through the design experience.  Collectively, MSW -1 and MSW – 2 will provide users with the knowledge to use hydrologic and hydraulic simulation software to assist in BMP design and evaluation to meet these new requirements.

Stormwater Management  (1 Day – 6.8 Contact Hours)

This one-day course focuses on understanding the issues related to stormwater and provide steps to manage and reduce problems resulting from stormwater. We look at stormwater from a cause and effect approach to identify the contributing factors and discuss available options to mitigate negative effects of runoff on both an operational and planning level, ultimately to provide a better understanding of what is available and what can be done to improve the management and maintenance of the watershed we live in. This course covers the critical components of stormwater runoff, runoff pollutants, the watershed, mitigation options, regulations and management approaches. It has been developed for highway and public works officials, superintendents, crew leaders, field supervisors, and anyone else interested in learning about the fundamental concepts, management and maintenance of stormwater. This training course is geared to provide a practical understanding of stormwater management.

Unconventional Interchange and Intersection Design (1 Day – 6.8 Contact Hours)

Many arterials and interchanges are terribly congested, and conventional measures offer little prospect for relief.  Unconventional designs offer some potential for relatively inexpensive improvements to those congested arterials and interchanges.  These are designs that have been used in some states or have been researched but have not been placed into widespread use.  Examples include the superstreets being installed in Maryland and North Carolina, the median u-turns that Michigan has used for many years, and the diverging diamond interchanges that Missouri has recently opened to rave reviews.  In the right place with the details designed well, an unconventional design can deliver great safety, efficiency, environmental, and cost benefits to motorists and transportation agencies.

The purpose of this course will be to discuss the best of the unconventional intersection and interchange options in some depth.  We will explore the history, planning, design, and operation of the major designs.  By the end of the course students should understand which design has a realistic chance to help in a particular spot.  The course will cover intersection, corridor, and interchange alternatives.

General

Advanced AutoCAD Civil 3D (2 Days – 13.6 Contact Hours)

This two day class is a follow up to the Fundamentals of AutoCAD Civil 3D. However a student proficient in Civil 3D who fully understands Points, Surfaces, Alignments and Profiles could take this two day class.

This class covers primarily topics in transportation design and utilities. It is intermediate in nature with about 50% hands on in-class activity.

Economic Evaluation of Public Projects (1 Day – 6.8 Contact Hours)

Decision-making has become a major aspect of the transportation professional’s daily activity.  Making good decision is no longer a luxury but a necessity.  This workshop will provide attendees with an analytical framework for decision-making from an economic viewpoint.  Workshop attendees will be provided with the theory, knowledge, and tools used to analyze commonly-encountered engineering problems and make realistic choices between competing alternative solutions based on sound engineering and economic principles.

Fundamentals of AutoCAD Civil 3D (3 Days – 20.4 Contact Hours)

This three day class is designed to give the student an introduction/refresher in AutoCAD 2014 as well as an understanding of the fundamentals of Autodesk AutoCAD Civil 3D. Familiarity and experience with AutoCAD helpful but not necessary. Exercises will be assigned along the way with a 50/50 mix of hands on and lecture.

Note to UVA CEE Students: This short course complements and greatly extends the AutoCAD Civil 3D experience that you have gained or will gain in courses such as CE 2010, CE 3400, and CE 4991.  The course is ideally suited for students wishing to gain a proficiency in AutoCAD Civil 3D to compete for internships and entry-level positions.

Overview of Transportation Sustainability (1 Day – 6.8 Contact Hours)

This workshop is intended to provide an overview of transportation sustainability including a description of what is sustainability, introduction of the sustainability triple bottom line, why it’s important, and who is responsible for sustainability including the role of government transportation staff.  Technical topics include sustainability rating systems; considering sustainability in planning, design, and maintenance; and sustainability topics related to coastal infrastructure reliability, sustainable freight movement, energy efficient urban transportation, enhanced water quality management, sustainable land use practices, social sustainability and public health, and finance and economic sustainability.  The workshop will introduce a sustainability management system with goals, indicators, strategies, and actions and discuss measuring sustainability impacts.  The workshop will include several small group and whole class discussions of sustainability.

Synchro and SimTraffic for Decision-Making (1 Day – 6.8 Hours)

The University of Virginia invites you to attend a presentation-led workshop focusing on select applications and capabilities of the popular SynchroTM and SimTrafficTM software programs. The intent of this workshop is to provide a higher-level overview and further develop an understanding of the capabilities and modeling requirements in application of these software packages, without in-depth software-based training. The workshop will conclude with a team exercise and mock traffic study review. The target audience includes, but is not limited to, engineers and planners seeking a basic understanding of the software and desire to interpret results. No previous experience with the software is necessary. This workshop is not intended to replace needed software-based training. Participants will be provided a copy of the workshop presentation material. Participants may also bring personal laptop computers (not required).

Synchro and SimTraffic Tips and Tricks (1 Day – 6.8 Contact Hours)

The University of Virginia invites you to attend a presentation-led workshop on various modeling tips and tricks to keep in mind in the course of using the popular SynchroTM and SimTrafficTM software programs. The intent of this workshop is to provide detailed technical information that may be used by modelers to better develop and use these traffic analysis tools. The workshop will also provide highlights of what’s new in Version 8.0 of the software as well as support for the 2010 Highway Capacity Manual methods. The target audience includes, but is not limited to, intermediate to advanced-level users, previously-trained, who are seeking a more-depth understanding of the software capabilities and developing guidelines for greater success. Previous experience with the software is required. This workshop is not a substitute for needed software-based training. Participants will be provided a copy of the workshop presentation material. Select demonstrations of the software will be provided by the instructor. Participants may also bring personal laptop computers (not required).

Understanding Road Design and Maintenance For Elected Officials (1 Day – 6.8 Contact Hours)

This course is the first step in understanding the problems that a Municipal Road department faces on a daily basis. This course designed for elected officials conveys an understanding of design and maintenance of municipal roads that will make your life easier when dealing with Road Superintendents, Public Works Directors, Foremen etc. It also gives elected officials a better understanding of what is involved in a Road & Street Budget.

Highway Safety

Accident Reconstruction (1 Day – 6.8 Contact Hours)

With the growing number of claims against roadway agencies, traffic crash investigation and reconstruction are key elements of an effective risk management program.  On-scene field personnel must be aware of the data needs of the reconstructionist to gather the perishable data required for a successful defense or resolution of a claim.  Understanding the capabilities and limitations of accident reconstruction will prepare agency attorneys to better evaluate a claim’s validity.  At-scene and after-accident investigation and data collection are discussed.  Collection techniques for roadway, vehicle, and other crash-related data are described.  Common reconstruction techniques and their applications are reviewed.

Intersection Safety Workshop (1 Day – 6.8 Contact Hours)

Intersection safety is a significant part of highway safety.  Intersections are intended to operate with vehicles, pedestrians and bicyclists proceeding in many directions, often simultaneously.  Given these conflicts, it is not surprising that nationally, intersection fatalities, injuries and crashes make up about 21 percent of all crashes and 55 percent of crashes in urban areas.

There are a number of “best practice” techniques for reducing the incidence of intersection crashes.  The objective of this workshop is to reduce the incidence of intersection crashes through the application of readily-available best practices.  The focus of the session is on what can be done now through traffic control devices, lighting and geometric design applications.  The results of effectiveness and engineering studies conducted across the country have been synthesized into this workshop for direct application to improve intersection safety.

Highway Safety Fundamentals (1 Day – 6.8 Contact Hours)

Building, operating and maintaining safer roads and bridges is one of the key emphasis areas of any highway agency.  Although collision rates are falling in Virginia and throughout the US from year to year, crash frequency is still too high. Fortunately, the techniques available to highway safety professionals as they try to provide safer highways are improving quickly. Decisions can now be based on solid data and rigorous analytical methods.  Lives and injuries will be saved by the application of these improved techniques. This workshop will provide instruction on the latest techniques that highway safety professionals can use to identify high hazard locations.  The session will review traditional selection techniques and will introduce new ones such as Bayesian methods, sites with promise, and induced exposure.

Low Cost Safety Improvements (1 Day – 6.8 Contact Hours)

Each year, motor vehicle crashes on U.S. roadways claim more than 30,000 lives, cause 3 million injuries, and involve $230 billion in costs. The Federal Highway Administration and AASHTO, among others, have identified roadway safety as a high priority. The consequences of motor vehicle crashes would not be nearly so high if programs, tools, and technologies that have been developed were more extensively deployed to make roads safer for travel. This workshop emphasizes the application of traffic control devices, enhanced traffic control device application measures, low-cost safety improvements, and their specific safety benefits in terms of crash modification factors. Signing, marking, and illumination are highlighted. The information is directly applicable to addressing requests and comments from the public.

Road Safety 365: A Safety Workshop for Local Governments (1 Day – 6.8 Contact Hours)

Rural roadways face unique safety challenges.  Rural crashes are more likely to be at higher speeds and involve unbelted occupants, and are therefore more severe than urban crashes.  Emergency response times are longer.  Hazards such as trees, utility poles and steep slopes are often close to the roadway.  In addition, budgets are severely limited and there may be a lack of awareness of safety issues.

This one-day workshop, aimed at local/rural road agencies, demonstrates how construction and maintenance activities impact roadway safety and encourages development of a safety mindset.  Practical guidance is provided on improving road safety that is specifically geared to the day-to-day activities and project development processes of local/rural road agencies.  Attendees will learn how to identify specific road safety problems and to identify practical, low-cost countermeasures to address the problems, both in existing roads and during project development.  Attendees will also be able to identify and access appropriate road safety information and use it effectively.

Road Safety Fundamentals (1 Day – 6.8 Contact Hours)

Traffic crashes have a tremendous cost in terms of lives lost, injuries, and monetary losses.  The majority of fatal and serious injury crashes occur on local roads.  On such roads, treating locations where safety problems occur or are likely to occur is usually more cost-effective than upgrading the entire local road network. Road safety refers to the portion of overall roadway safety that is determined by a roadway’s physical features such as road design, roadside objects, signs, pavement markings, and intersections.  Addressing road safety on local roads is a particular challenge because conditions and hazards vary widely and funds are extremely limited.  This workshop reviews some of the more common road safety problems and offers a practical systematic approach to solving them.

Hydrology

Hydrology for Transportation Engineers (1 Day – 6.8 Contact Hours)

This intensive one-day course provides engineers with the knowledge and skills necessary for the practical application of hydrologic principles to the design of typical highway drainage structures and stream crossings. Participants will learn how to select and apply appropriate methods for estimating peak flows and flood hydrographs for gaged and ungaged streams in watersheds of the size typically encountered in highway drainage design. Throughout the workshop, participants will work several example problems that stress design situations. Upon completion of the course, participants will be able to: gather precipitation and stream flow data; identify which peak flow estimation methods are suitable for watersheds with different characteristics and design requirements; estimate times of concentration; apply the SCS, regression, and rational methods for peak flow estimation; develop hydrographs using the unit hydrograph and other techniques; and perform storage routing calculations. Participants will be introduced to several commonly applied software packages and directed to applicable reference material for hydrologic analysis, including the Hydraulic Design Series (HDS) No. 2, “Highway Hydrology,” which serves as the primary reference for this course.

Hydraulic Modeling: Introduction to HEC-RAS (1 Day – 6.8 Contact Hours)

The University of Virginia invites you to attend a hands-on workshop for an introduction to hydraulic modeling using the Hydrologic Engineering Center’s River Analysis System, HEC-RAS. This workshop teaches participants how to use the program primarily through direct application, requiring each participant to build their own HEC-RAS model in various stages during the day. Model components to be covered include channel geometry data, flow data, simulation setup and execution, results, bridges, and culverts. Upon completion of the workshop, participants will be able to determine necessary data input requirements for hydraulic modeling, develop a simple HEC-RAS model, perform steady flow analyses to compute water surface elevations, review and analyze simulation results, and incorporate bridge and culvert geometry into a stream model. Participants will be provided with electronic files of all workshop material, including example files and the software user’s manual, and can elect to either work on the classroom computers or bring personal laptop computers.

Infrastructure Impacts of Sea Level Rise (1 Day – 6.8 Contact Hours)

This course is intended to provide an introduction to the impact of sea level rise and extreme weather events on infrastructure in mid-Atlantic coastal environments. The course will begin by providing an introduction to climate change and sea level rise including information on projected impacts of sea level rise and changes to extreme weather events to coastal environments within the mid-Atlantic region. Second, the course will focus on resilience of coastal systems providing an introduction to coastal forces, discussing the concept of resilience in coastal systems, and impacts of sea-level rise on resilience. Third, the course will discuss inland hydrologic systems including an introduction to hydrology and inland flooding impacts on infrastructure. The course will include lecture-based material, demonstrations, and class discussions. The workshop will conclude with a summary and review of available resources discussed throughout the day.

Legal

Tort Liability  (1 Day – 6.8 Contact Hours)

This workshop provides an overview of the legal duties and responsibilities of roadway personnel. Key legal concepts relating to the liability of roadway agencies are reviewed from a risk management standpoint. Common types of claims/lawsuits brought against street departments and roadway agencies are identified through examples/case studies. Examples include traffic control devices, work zones, roadway and shoulder surface conditions, sight distance, and pedestrian incidents. Risk management principles, aimed at: (1) reducing/preventing crashes and claims and (2) helping agencies defend claims, will be highlighted. Practical risk management activities will be identified. Specific topics covered include:

  • Brief Background to the Legal Process
  • Elements of a Tort Claim
  • Agency and Employee Liability
  • Tort Claims Process
  • Defenses to Tort Liability
  • Principles of Risk Management
  • Specific Measures to Reduce the Risk of Liability
  • Litigation Activities
  • Pretrial
  • Documentation
  • The Trial
  • Case Studies

Maintenance

Asphalt Pavement Maintenance and Resurfacing (1 Day – 6.8 Contact Hours)

State and local employees with road maintenance responsibilities should understand the causes of common maintenance problems on asphalt roads and be familiar with proper repair materials and methods. This course discusses causes and repair procedures for common problems such as cracking, potholes, rutting, corrugations, etc. The procedures cover materials, equipment, and techniques for lasting repairs. A brief discussion of surface treatment is also covered. This course also reviews the various asphalt mixes, their components and their uses. Asphalt resurfacing procedures are covered, including preparation, material, equipment, operation and safety. Special emphasis is placed on proper rolling and compaction of the asphalt overlay. Superpave mix design is discussed.

Asphalt Pavement Recycling (1 Day – 6.8 Contact Hours)

This course discusses the advantages of asphalt recycling as part of your road maintenance program. It covers techniques for recycling asphalt pavement, including surface recycling, hot mix recycling  both in plant and on site, and cold mix recycling. The course emphasizes cold mix recycling, full depth reclamation, reviewing materials, equipment and operations. It also presents recent examples of asphalt recycling projects in several states.

Basic Drainage (1 Day – 6.8 Contact Hours)

This course emphasizes the importance of good drainage with discussions of water and its effects on roads, problems caused by improper drainage, and ways to handle these problems.  It covers types of drainage facilities, ranging from ditches, culverts, subdrains, inlets and end structures. Their uses, materials, installation and maintenance as well as erosion control are addressed.  It also introduces geosynthetic drainage applications. While design of drainage facilities is covered in a general way this is not intended to be a drainage facility design course.

Common Maintenance Problems on Asphalt Roads (1/2 Day – 3.4 Contact Hours)

Municipal employees with road maintenance responsibilities should understand the causes of common maintenance problems on asphalt roads and be  familiar with proper repair materials and methods. This course discusses causes and repair procedures for common problems such as cracking, potholes, rutting, corrugations, etc. The procedures cover materials, equipment, and techniques for lasting repairs. Also included, a brief discussion of surface treatment.

Preventing Maintenance Problems on Asphalt Roads (1 Day – 6.8 Contact Hours)

State and local employees with road maintenance responsibilities should understand the causes of common maintenance problems on asphalt roads and be familiar with proper repair materials and methods. This course discusses causes and repair procedures for common problems such as cracking, potholes, rutting, corrugations, etc. The procedures cover materials, equipment, and techniques for lasting repairs. A brief discussion of surface treatment is also covered. This course also reviews the various asphalt mixes, their components and their uses. Asphalt resurfacing procedures are covered, including preparation, material, equipment, operation and safety. Special emphasis is placed on proper rolling and compaction of the asphalt overlay. Superpave mix design is discussed.

Maintenance of Gravel Roads (1 Day – 6.8 Contact Hours)

This course addresses basic maintenance techniques for unpaved and gravel roads. Topics include road materials, blading or dragging, reshaping or regrading for proper crown, regravelling, stabilization or full-depth reclamation, and dust control, with an introduction to road management techniques.

Winter Maintenance Operations (1 Day – 6.8 Contact Hours)

This course covers all aspects of winter operations – planning and organizing, methods of snow and ice control, salt usage, and winter equipment maintenance. Lesson will include usage of snow maps and formal snow plans. Also covered will be snow plow and salt spreader operation.

Materials

An Introduction to Warm Mix Asphalt Material and the Full Depth Reclamation Process (1 Day – 6.8 Contact Hours)

This course introduces the participants to the new technology that is being used nationwide to produce plant mixed asphalt at a lower temperature.  Industry trends towards the use of this material over conventional hot mix asphalt indicate it could be the preferred material of the future.  This course will discuss the history of this material and the benefits and advantages of its use.  A comparison with conventional Hot Mix Asphalt will be provided.  The participants will be provided with the operational temperature requirements for material delivery acceptance and compaction of Warm Mix Asphalt.

The second portion of the course will introduce the participants to the roadway rehabilitation technique process of Full Depth Reclamation.  This portion will provide the participant with an alternative to consider when planning road and street projects.  This process of recycling existing pavement materials saving energy and valuable resources will be discussed.  The participants will be shown typical roadway distress that can be addressed by Full Depth Reclamation.  The various types of the Full Depth Reclamation process will be described.  The operational sequence of performing this activity will be presented.

This course is intended for individuals responsible for asset management project planning, and inspection of roadway improvement projects.  This includes those involved in selecting preparation techniques and ordering asphalt material to maintain streets and roadways.   This includes Public Works Directors, Supervisors, Foremen and Equipment Operators.

Principles of Paving (1 Day – 6.8 Contact Hours)

The course will provide the participant with information needed to properly plan and monitor a hot mix asphalt paving project. Basic knowledge of hot mix asphalt materials and equipment will be provided. The importance of proper roadway preparation to obtain a long lasting product will be discussed.   A basic understanding of the delivery, placement, and compaction process in paving operations will be provided.

This course is for individuals who are involved in the planning, inspecting, and placement of asphalt paving operations.  Individuals involved in paving with hot mix asphalt, such as superintendents, foremen and equipment operators that operate rollers, pavers, distributors, and dump trucks on the job. Others who would benefit from this course include: inspectors, and street supervisors involved in monitoring hot mix asphalt paving projects.

Repair of Concrete (1 Day – 6.8 Contact Hours)

The workshop covers the latest techniques for repairing reinforced concrete bridges and other structures. Topics covered include defining the problem, locating deteriorated concrete, concrete removal, surface preparation, patching, crack repairs, hydraulic cement concrete overlays, epoxy overlays, membranes, sealers and other corrosion protection methods.

Soils for Pavement Design (1 Day – 6.8 Contact Hours)

The use of asphalt in roadways has increased significantly over the past several decades due to asphalt’s ease of application and its ability to function in varying climates.  Asphalt pavement design itself however, must begin with an investigation into the properties of the foundation soils.  This course is designed to provide participants with an overview of the considerations that should be taken into account regarding underlying soil conditions when designing asphalt pavements.

The following topics will be covered in this short course offering:

  • Overview of basic soil composition, and the methods used in sampling and soil investigation;
  • Soil testing including particle size analysis, specific gravity, Atterberg limits testing, and moisture-density testing;
  • Classification of Soils; and
  • Testing for the determination of soil strength including: California Bearing Ratio, plate bearing test, the resistance R-value test method for compacted soils, and resilience modulus testing.

Use of Geosynthetic Materials in Road Maintenance (1 Day – 6.8 Contact Hours)

This course is an introduction to the use geosynthetics, beginning with a discussion of geosynthetics, what they are, how they are made and how they can be used in a road maintenance program. The course then looks at other geosynthetics and their road system uses, including geogrids, geocells and geowebs, presenting new materials with new applications.

Planning

Access Management (2 Days – 13.6 Contact Hours)

The workshop will cover the latest access design principles, access management techniques, retrofit programs, legal implications, and design guidelines.  Included in the materials will be examples of State Highway Access Code and procedures for estimating the potential benefits from an access management program.  Impacts on the business community will also be discussed. This course concludes with an access management exercise that will require participants to design a retrofit access plan for Leesburg Road in Northern Virginia.

Fundamentals of Stormwater (1 Day – 6.8 Contact Hours)

Stormwater has been an important issue for planners, developers, municipalities, and state and federal governments for many years. Regulations and laws have been implemented to reduce the impacts associated with stormwater runoff throughout the United States. However, much of the available training moves directly to the technical aspects of addressing runoff and often glosses over many of the critical stormwater issues. These items are critical to the understanding of what factors influence runoff and how available practices address the issues associated with stormwater runoff. This one-day course focuses on understanding the issues related to stormwater and provide steps to manage and reduce problems resulting from stormwater. We look at stormwater from a cause and effect approach to identify the contributing factors and discuss available options to mitigate negative effects of runoff on both an operational and planning level, ultimately to provide a better understanding of what is available and what can be done to improve the management and maintenance of the watershed we live in. This course covers the critical components of stormwater runoff, runoff pollutants, the watershed, mitigation options, regulations and management approaches. It has been developed for highway and public works officials, superintendents, crew leaders, field supervisors, and anyone else interested in learning about the fundamental concepts, management and maintenance of stormwater. This training course is geared to provide a practical understanding of stormwater.

Parking Studies (1 Day – 6.8 Contact Hours)

Parking is a critical and often over-looked aspect of our transportation system.  Any glance at an aerial photo of an urban or suburban area in the US will show that parking consumes vast quantities of land.  Parking is also an enormous cost for individuals, businesses, cities, and other institutions.  There is no such thing as “free parking” of course:  every parking space is paid for in full by someone.  Parking is important from a professional point of view.  Many transportation engineers and planners have responsibilities for parking planning, design, and operation.  Parking is also a changing industry, with new concepts and technologies emerging to help those professionals.

The objective of this one-day course is to show transportation engineers and planners how to conduct a parking study.  This includes how to collect needed data, how to determine the parking demand for a parcel or an area, how to establish a price, and how to design the space.  The course will also present new concepts and technologies—in zoning regulations, tax policy, intelligent transportation systems, meters, and others—that will change the way parking is managed in the future.  The course will cover many areas from central business districts to residences, with an emphasis on smaller cities and new developments where most professional activity in Virginia is likely.  The course will be appropriate as a refresher for those who have done some parking studies, an introduction for those new to the area, and a look ahead for those expecting to do some work in this area in the future.  No prior parking study experience is necessary.

Site Impact Analysis (2 Days – 13.6 Contact Hours)

Participants will learn the latest techniques for estimating the traffic impacts of both small and large site developments. Included in the materials will be procedures for land use forecasting, trip generation, trip distribution and assignment, and site impact layout design. Levels of service will also be covered. The workshop will be conducted with manual procedures, but computer software packages suitable for site impact analysis will also be demonstrated.

Project Management

Construction Inspection (1 Day – 6.8 Contact Hours)

This one day session will cover some of the major duties and responsibilities of an individual responsible for the quality of a project. It will address the importance of understanding the plans, the contract, the order of operations, the materials to be used and the various quality control tests used in project inspection. This course is presented in a straight forward manner and deals with the reality of everyday factors involving contractors and agencies. Qualified field inspection personnel with one to three years of field experience are encouraged to attend; participants must possess basic math skills in geometry and algebra.

Intermediate Construction Inspection (2 Days – 13.6 Contact Hours)

This two day session will cover the major duties and responsibilities of an individual responsible for the quality of a project. It will address the importance of understanding the plans, the contract, the materials to be used and the various quality control tests used in project inspection. . Emphasis will be placed on materials and operations and the important aspects of what to look for that can result in problems after the job is completed. This course will not benefit persons who are looking for a faster way to put checkmarks in a box on a form.

Partnering 101: The Practical Application of Partnering & Risk Management Fundamentals (1 Day – 6.8 Contact Hours)

The University of Virginia invites you to attend a workshop on partnering and risk management principles and how they are applied to construction projects at the Virginia Department of Transportation.  This workshop teaches participants how to use basic partnering principles and risk methodologies that can be applied to any application or program.   The course will review specific VDOT construction project applications, examples, and benefits.  Topics covered will include group exercises, partnering principles & values, the importance of communications, trust, and issue resolution, partnering processes, identifying project risks, barriers to progress, developing project surveys, risk mitigation plans, performance metrics, project charters, and various other components.  Upon completion of the workshop, participants will be able to better identify situations that arise over conflict and be prepared to resolve these issues more quickly on the job.  Participants will be provided with a booklet and electronic files of all workshop material, and access to tables, spreadsheets, and databases that may aid them in properly partnering projects.

Project Cost Estimating (1 Day – 6.8 Contact Hours)

The accurate estimation of costs provides a foundation for the effective development and delivery of projects.  The estimate of project costs is a critical function that is conducted throughout the development and delivery of highway projects and other types of improvement initiatives on the surface transportation system.  The ability to develop, manage, and control project cost estimates is a critical function that is conducted in the planning, programming, preliminary and final design, and procurement of projects.  The escalation of costs and challenges with financing, developing and implementing highway related projects is a critical concern to all public agencies.  There are a number of factors and issues that contribute to the escalation of cost throughout the project development process.   Public agencies are exploring opportunities to improve how they develop, manage and control the estimation and ultimate project costs throughout the project development process.  The ability to improve the consistency and how project costs are estimated, managed and controlled throughout the project development process is critical to the success of each project and an agency project development and delivery program.  This course will introduce participants to the basic concepts, challenges and best practices with estimating and managing project cost estimates.  This course will provide participants with an overview of the: 1) fundamentals of cost estimating, 2) process of developing project costs, managing cost estimates, 3) cost escalation factors, 4) deterministic and risk based cost estimating, and 5) how cost estimating varies in the project development process.  Upon completion of this course, participants will be able to: Describe the steps in developing a cost estimate; Discuss possible strategies to manage the cost estimating process; Identify a range of factors influencing the escalation of project costs; Discuss the strengths and limitations of deterministic cost estimating process; Describe when it may be appropriate to use a deterministic or risk-based cost estimating process; and Explain how the cost estimating process changes throughout the project development process.

Project Development (1 Day – 6.8 Contact Hours)

State DOTs and local agencies when developing projects involving federal-aid must follow a prescribed set of rules, regulations, and procedures.  This course will cover the various steps necessary to meet the federal requirements.  The course will be initiated with a discussion of categorical funds and what activities they are eligible for.  A detailed presentation will be made on how the federal highway financial system works and the process that determines the amount of federal funds that will be available to the States and MPOs.  Presentations will then be made on federal rules  to meet planning and environmental requirements, right-of-way rules and requirements (the Uniform Act), design standards, the bridge inspection program requirements.  Federal contract requirements will also be presented that discuss a broad of issues such as use of proprietary materials, contract bidding rules, contract provisions, etc.  Class exercises will be used to demonstrate typical real life issues involving the development of federal-aid projects.

Project Inspection

This one-day session will cover the major duties and responsibilities of an individual responsible for the quality of a project. It will address the importance of understanding the plans, the contract, the materials to be used and the various quality control tests used in project inspection. A short session on calculating rates of applications, areas and volumes will be presented also. Emphasis will be placed on materials and operations and the important aspects of what to look for that can result in problems after the job is completed.

Project Management (1 Day – 6.8 Contact Hours)

Whether involved in planning, design, construction, maintenance, operations, environmental studies, or business support, transportation professionals frequently find themselves in the role of project manager. Regardless of the type of project, knowledge of project management terminology, concepts, and the tools available to monitor and control project phases can be the difference between success and failure. The objective of Project Management for the Transportation Professional is to introduce and demonstrate essential processes and tools needed to successfully manage projects. The course will focus on the basics of project planning, project control, and leadership. Students will have the opportunity to apply principles discussed in class through a transportation case study. The objective of this course is to introduce students to the fundamentals of project management.  As an introductory class, this course will not provide in-depth instruction in any one area of project management, but rather expose students to sound project management practices and demonstrate basic project management skills and techniques.

Project Scheduling (1 Day – 6.8 Contact Hours)

The ability to effectively develop and use schedules is fundamental to sound project management.  This class will introduce participants to the schedule development process, and also to the use of project schedules for project control purposes. Participants will gain hands-on experience with common project management practices to reinforce key concepts. This course will introduce participants to the basic concepts, challenges, and best practices with establishing and managing a project schedule.  This course will provide participants with an overview of: 1) fundamentals of project scheduling, 2) the process of developing project schedules, 3) establishing a critical path, 4) potential risks impacting schedules, 5) project controls, 6) managing project schedules.  Upon completion of this course, participants will be able to: Identify the key elements that are used to develop a project schedule; Describe the steps to developing a project schedule; Discuss how to determine a project’s critical path; List possible risks that may impact a project’s schedule; Describe project controls that may be used to monitor and assess a project’s schedule; and Discuss what project contracts may be appropriate to apply and when n order to ensure a project remains on schedule.

Techniques for Reducing Construction and Maintenance Costs (1 Day – 6.8 Contact Hours)

Counties and municipalities bear a considerable financial burden with respect to the construction and maintenance of roadways. Inflation, increasing cost of labor, materials and fuel have risen steeply in the past few years. At the same time municipal budgets have not kept pace. It is essential to conserve resources, find energy efficient and low maintenance materials and to use more efficient techniques. This workshop will conclude with groups of participants developing a cost control plan for a project.

Traffic Engineering and Traffic Operations

Advanced Signal Timing Design (1 Day – 6.8 Contact Hours)

This course will provide fundamentals on traffic signalizations including basics of traffic signal control, the Highway Capacity Manual delay equation and the HCM procedure, dual ring structure, and the principles applied in the traffic signal timing design, as well as overview of traffic signal timing optimization tools and hands on exercise with  SYNCHRO program. The objectives of this course are to provide (i) fundamental knowledge in traffic signal timing design and (ii) hands on exercise of SYNCHRO to develop traffic signal timing plan. At the end of this course, participants will be able to understand principles applied in the traffic signal timing design.

Applications of Traffic Simulation Models (1 Day – 6.8 Contact Hours)

This course intends to provide fundamentals on traffic simulation modeling and its applications so that traffic engineers can properly choose/implement appropriate modeling tools for their analysis needs, and decision makers understand the importance of applying simulation modeling tools in supporting decision making process. At the end of the course, participants will understand how to choose appropriate traffic simulation model, how to apply traffic simulation for decision making process, why the calibration of traffic simulation is important, and how one can apply traffic simulation model calibration procedure.

Applied Roundabout Design (1 Day – 6.8 Contact Hours)

This course is intended to serve as an introduction to the principles of roundabout design using NCHRP Report 672: Roundabouts an Informational Guide, Second Edition. The guide has been adopted by the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) as the official roundabout guide, and is used throughout the United States by consultants, and state and local agencies for the planning, operations, safety and design of roundabouts.

Upon completion of this course, participants will:

– Have a basic understanding of roundabout applications;
– Understand the guiding principles of roundabout design;
– Be able to perform basic design checks of a single-lane roundabout;
– Understand the principles of roundabout design for single-lane and multilane roundabout
– Be able to sketch a concept single-lane roundabout; and
– Understand the nuances of roundabout design related to vertical design, pedestrian and  bicycle treatments, right-turn bypass lanes and roundabout interchange design.

Freeway Management and Traffic Operations I (1 Day – 6.8 Contact Hours)

This course is designed to provide participants with an overview of freeway traffic management and operations.  This course will introduce the concepts and principles of monitoring, evaluating, managing, and controlling traffic on freeway facilities.  Participants will be introduced to the key policies, institutional issues, challenges, technologies, and issues to consider in support of managing and controlling traffic on freeway facilities.

This course will also provide an overview of how these concepts and principles can be applied in the planning, design, construction, maintenance, or operation of freeway facilities.  This course will provide participants with a basic understanding of: (1) freeway traffic management and operations, (2) managing and controlling traffic on freeways, (3) performance monitoring, evaluation and reporting, (4) improving freeway performance with low-cost short-term freeway improvements, and (5) analyzing traffic flow and freeway operational strategies.  An introduction of this material, course examples, course summary, and review of available resources will also be covered in the course.

This course is designed to introduce both new and experienced personnel to the practice of freeway management and traffic operations.  This course is appropriate for personnel that may be responsible for performing a function or task which may directly or indirectly influence decisions that are made during the planning, design, maintenance, management, operation, or provision of services that will influence the performance of freeway related facilities.  This course is based upon the Freeway Management and Operations Handbook, September 2003 (FHWA-OP-04-003, EDL No. 13875) and the Traffic Analysis Tools Primer (FHWA-HRT-04-038).

Freeway Management and Traffic Operations II (1 Day – 6.8 Contact Hours)

This course is designed to provide participants with an introduction to the range of potential policies, programs, services, operational strategies, and technologies that could be used to enhance the operation of traffic on freeway facilities.  This course will introduce the principles and fundamentals that support the proactive management and control of traffic in response to planned and unplanned events that may impact the flow of traffic on freeway facilities.  This course will build off of the topics and overview of freeway traffic management and operations that were presented in the Freeway Traffic Management and Operations – Part I course.

Participants will be introduced to the key policies, institutional issues, challenges and barriers, methods, technologies, and other technical issues to consider to enhance the day-to-day operational of traffic on freeway facilities, the development and implementation of new operational strategies, or the development of roadway improvements.  This course will provide participants with a basic understanding of: (1) improving freeway performance, (2) ramp management and control, (3) traffic incident management, (4) active traffic management, (5) traffic and traveler information, and (6) planned special events.  An introduction of this material, course examples, course summary, and review of available resources will also be covered in the course.

This course is designed to introduce both new and experienced personnel to the practice of freeway management and traffic operations.  This course is appropriate for personnel that may be responsible for performing a function or task which may directly or indirectly influence decisions that are made during the planning, design, maintenance, management, operation, or provision of services that will influence the performance of freeway related facilities.  This course is based upon the Freeway Management and Operations Handbook, September 2003 (FHWA-OP-04-003, EDL No. 13875) and the Traffic Analysis Tools Primer (FHWA-HRT-04-038).

Fundamentals of Traffic Engineering (1 Day – 6.8 Contact Hours)

This course will provide fundamentals on traffic engineering including traffic engineering studies (e.g., volume, speed, and travel time and delay studies), basic probability and statistics for engineers (e.g., hypothesis testing and design issues in engineering field studies), highway safety (e.g., crash data analysis and statistical comparisons), traffic regulations and control (e.g., speed and intersection control), traffic signals and control, and the intelligent transportation system and IntelliDrive. The objective of this course is to provide fundamental knowledge in traffic engineering. At the end of this course, participants will be able to understand principles applied in the traffic engineering as well as related engineering studies.

Highway Capacity Analysis (1 Day – 6.8 Contact Hours)

The operational performance of highways and streets are critical to ensuring the safe and efficient flow of people, traffic and goods on the surface transportation system.  Agencies and practitioners continually face challenges with assessing or predicting the traffic operational impacts associated with different roadway improvements, traffic operational strategies, and control plans.  Traffic analysis methods and tools have been developed to assist practitioners with assessing the potential impacts of different strategies in support of advancing traffic operational strategies and improvements which meet the transportation needs of their agency. Traffic analysis concepts, methods and tools provide practitioners with the ability to assess the operational impacts associated with the interactions that occur between vehicles, drivers, and the roadway.  Practitioners are challenged with selecting the appropriate traffic analysis methodologies, tools, and performance measures.  Selections which are critical to assessing the flow of traffic and potential influence different improvements may have on the operation of surface transportation facilities.  For many facilities and proposed improvements, the methods and procedures of the Highway Capacity Manual (HCM) are sufficient for analyzing surface transportation facilities with limited or no traffic congestion.  However, the HCM may not be the most appropriate tool to use on congested facilities where queue’s of vehicles form, the performance of different elements of the roadway impact other elements, and an assessment is needed for a section of a roadway.  This course will provide participants with a basic understanding of (1) highway capacity, (2) level-of-service, (3) when it may be appropriate to use different traffic analysis methods and the HCM,  (4) the range of capacity analysis procedures appropriate for different types of facilities, and (5) how to interpret the results of a capacity analysis.  Participants will develop an appreciation for selecting the appropriate traffic analysis methodology and tool, determine when it may be appropriate to perform a capacity analysis, identify which HCM analysis procedure may be appropriate, and how to interpret the results. Upon completion of this course, participants will be able to: Identify issues to consider when selecting a traffic analysis methodology and tool; Describe a range of capacity analysis procedures; Explain the concepts of capacity and level-of-service; Discuss when a capacity analysis may be appropriate; Identify differences with analyzing the flow of traffic on facilities with interrupted and uninterrupted flow; and Explain how to interpret the results of a capacity analysis.

Highway Capacity Manual: Interrupted Flow Facilities (1 Day – 6.8 Contact Hours)

The Highway Capacity Manual (HCM) remains the foundation for traffic analysis in the US. Whether an analyst uses an elaborate software package or makes a back-of-the-envelope calculation, HCM concepts and techniques are likely at the heart of the effort. Anyone can push buttons in a piece of software; knowing the HCM is necessary to correctly frame questions, to avoid errors and traps, and to correctly interpret the output.

This is the second of two one-day workshops focued on familiarizing attendees with the concepts and techniques used in the HCM to analyze traffic operations. The two workshops will cover all of the most popular chapters of the HCM, and will include much of the new material in the 2010 edition. The workshops will emphasize basic principles and will be independent of any particular software package (if possible, attendees should bring a laptop with a spreadsheet to solve class exercises). For each major chapter of the HCM, attendees will hear about the theory, discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the approach, discuss applications, watch a practice problem being solved, and solve their own practice problems.

This particular workshop will cover facilities with interrupted flow, like signalized intersections and roundabouts. While attending both workshops will provide the most complete coverage of the HCM, the workshops will be independent of each other and it is not necessary to attend both to follow the discussion and gain benefit.

Highway Capacity Manual: Uninterrupted Flow Facilities (1 Day – 6.8 Contact Hours)

The Highway Capacity Manual (HCM) remains the foundation for traffic analysis in the US. Whether an analyst uses an elaborate software package or makes a back-of-the-envelope calculation, HCM concepts and techniques are likely at the heart of the effort. Anyone can push buttons in a piece of software; knowing the HCM is necessary to correctly frame questions, to avoid errors and traps, and to correctly interpret the output.
This is the first of two one-day workshops focued on familiarizing attendees with the concepts and techniques used in the HCM to analyze traffic operations. The two workshops will cover all of the most popular chapters of the HCM, and will include much of the new material in the 2010 edition. The workshops will emphasize basic principles and will be independent of any particular software package (if possible, attendees should bring a laptop with a spreadsheet to solve class exercises). For each major chapter of the HCM, attendees will hear about the theory, discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the approach, discuss applications, watch a practice problem being solved, and solve their own practice problems.

This particular workshop will cover facilities with uninterrupted flow, like freeways and two-lane highways. The second-day workshop will cover facilities with interrupted flow, like signalized intersections and roundabouts. While attending both workshops will provide the most complete coverage of the HCM, the workshops will be independent of each other and it is not necessary to attend both to follow the discussion and gain benefit.

HSM Calibration Factors & Surrogate Safety (1 Day – 6.8 Contact Hours)

Module 1 – Highway Safety Manual (HSM) Application for the State of Maryland: Local Calibration Factors (LCF) and beyond

The first half of the today’s workshop will discuss the Morgan State University research team’s experience with two studies employing the Highway Safety Manual (HSM). This part of the workshop consists of three sections. First, a brief introduction of HSM, data collection and the development of local calibration factors (LCFs) for Maryland are discussed. Then the safety analysis for identifying priority improvement locations on I-495 interchanges is presented. This part of the analysis was carried out based on the proposed new HSM chapters for Interstate highways. Lastly, the speakers will discuss barriers that practitioners and researchers should overcome to get the most out of HSM and also talk about several alternative directions for safety analysis.

Module 2 – Integrated Surrogate Safety Assessment Model

The second half of this workshop will discuss an application of a surrogate safety assessment model that can be used in such conditions where historical crash data are not available or new technology is under consideration. It will cover an overview of the Surrogate Safety Assessment Model, a hands-on application of SSAM and an enhanced SSAM framework and applications. At the end of the second half of the workshop, participants should understand the value of utilizing SSAM while understanding its limitations.

Expected Outcome

Upon completion of the workshop, the participants will understand the development, limitations, and alternatives for Highway Safety Manual local calibration factors and a real world Surrogate Safety Assessment Model application.

Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (1 Day – 6.8 Contact Hours)

Traffic control devices are critical to ensuring the safe and efficient flow of people, traffic and goods on the surface transportation system.  The Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD) provides the minimum standards and guidance to ensure uniformity and consistency with how traffic control devices are designed, installed, operated, maintained, and managed on streets and highways open to public travel. The appropriate installation, operation, and maintenance of traffic control devices are critical to ensuring the safe, efficient and cost effective operation of these facilities. Decisions to design and install traffic control devices for specific applications should be based on a engineering study and use of engineering judgment. This ability to evaluate the need, design, install, maintain, and operate traffic control devices is foundational to sound traffic and transportation management.  This course will introduce participants to the principles of traffic control devices and the fundamentals of evaluating the need and making decisions to install traffic control devices.  Participants will gain an appreciation of how the MUTCD can be used in making decisions on traffic control devices.  Describe the requirements justifying the installation of traffic control devices; Describe the process for conducting a engineering study to determine the need and to design traffic control devices; Discuss how the MUTCD categories are used when making decisions to install traffic control devices; Identify the differences between regulatory, warning and guide signs; and Explain traffic signal warrants and how they are used when decisions are made to install or remove traffic signals.

Signal Warrant and Intersection Control Analysis (1 Day – 6.8 Contact Hours)

This course reviews the 8 signal warrants as contained in the MUTCD.  Each warrant is discussed in detail and covers such issues as how to define what is an acceptable school zone gap and how to define avoidable crashes.  Subsequent to the introduction of each warrant, the class works on an intersection exercise to determine if the signal warrants have been met for a selected intersection.  Also included in the course are the warrants for four-way stops and school guard crossing guidelines.  A demonstration of signal warrants analysis software is presented at the close of the course.

Traffic Calming (1 Day – 6.8 Contact Hours)

This course is intended to provide an overview of traffic calming and the tools needed to make decisions regarding applications.  This one-day course on this topic provides a foundation in the evolution of traffic calming policies and practices.  Detailed information on commonly-used traffic calming measures is then presented, addressing selection, design, effectiveness, and several case studies.  The course concludes with a workshop and review of available resources.  Upon completion of this course, participants will be able to: describe concepts and components in traffic calming plans and policies;  Select and design traffic calming measures; Quantify the effectiveness of commonly-used traffic calming measures; and Develop a model policy and procedure for applying traffic calming measures.

Work Zone Safety

Advanced Work Zone Traffic Control (2 Days – 13.6 Contact Hours)

Federal requirements now instruct state and local governments to train personnel in work zone traffic control relevant to the job decisions that each individual is required to make. This workshop provides training needed to properly install and monitor work zones for construction and maintenance projects for long-term (greater than three consecutive days) operations. This course provides comprehensive training on work zone standards, guidelines, installations and removal procedures, inspection, liability, documentation and supervisory skills. Several workshops included in this course are designed to provide hands-on experience implementing and modifying temporary traffic control plans for various real-life situations. It also teaches how to recognize, analyze, correct, and document deficiencies. At the conclusion of this workshop, a short open-book written exam will be administered to all attendees. A VDOT-issued training card will be given to each attendee who achieves a passing grade of 80% or higher.

Basic Work Zone Traffic Control (1 Day – 6.8 Contact Hours)

As traffic volumes increase and the need to repair and improve roadways becomes greater, so does the need to plan, install, and review work zone traffic control to effectively and safely perform the work.  Federal requirements now instruct state and local governments to train personnel in work zone traffic control relevant to the job decisions that each individual is required to make.  This workshop provides training needed to properly install work zones to perform daily maintenance or short-term operations.  Emphasis is placed on the basics of work zone traffic control, focusing on work zone devices and how to effectively install and maintain them.  At the conclusion of this workshop, a short open-book written exam will be administered to all attendees.  A VDOT-issued training card will be given to each attendee who achieves a passing grade of 80% or higher

Intermediate Work Zone Traffic Control (2 Days – 13.6 Contact Hours)

Intermediate Work Zone Traffic Control training is a 2-day course focusing on temporary traffic control for long term construction and maintenance projects. Attendees are taught concepts, techniques, and practices in work zone standards and guidelines covering the proper installation, inspection, documentation and removal of work zone traffic control.  Several exercises included in this course are designed to provide hands-on experience implementing and modifying temporary traffic control plans for various real life situations.

Workforce Development

Building and Leading High Performing Teams (1 Day – 6.8 Contact Hours)

We can all agree on the advantages of high performing teams. The research is clear. High performing teams are better at innovation, have greater productivity, and use resources more effectively. High performing teams are not formed. They are built. This course is designed to share the best insights from research and current best practices in high performance teambuilding. The course is hands-on, including case studies, practice material, and participant discussion. A focus is placed on applying the new skills within the work unit.

Construction Math (1 Day – 6.8 Contact Hours)

A refresher workshop on basic math skills to include fractions, whole numbers, addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, computing areas and volumes, percentages and ratios. Transportation-related examples are used to illustrate the points.